Casual Mobile Game Statistics You Need to Know in 2021

Casual Mobile Game Statistics You Need to Know in 2021

When it comes to advertising a casual mobile game, it’s crucial that you’re familiar with all the metrics and statistics.

That’s why we have decided to put together all the most important casual mobile game statistics for 2021 including retention rate, average session length, ARPPU, ARPDAU, conversion rates, and CPI’s by country.

 

Table of Contents

 

Casual Mobile Games User Retention Statistics

When it comes to mobile games, user retention is one of the most important KPIs. It’s simple – without users who keep playing your mobile game, you can’t monetize it.

However, achieving a good retention rate is anything but easy. The competition is ruthless, and everybody is fighting for users’ attention.

When it comes to tracking user retention, it is most commonly calculated for day 1, day 7, and day 28.

 

Day 1 Retention for Casual Mobile Games

According to GameAnalytics, if a mobile game has 35% retention after day 1 or above, it’s doing good (that’s the average retention of the top 25% most successful mobile games). Anything below that should be improved. Otherwise, chances are your mobile game will not be financially viable.

For the top 2% of the games, we see the highest day 1 retention in March (51.14%). The lowest day 1 retention was noticed in September (49.39%). 

Day 1 retention for the top 25% of games ranged from 30.37% in September to 32.27% in March, when it was the highest. 

If we look at the median 50% of casual games, day 1 retention was the lowest in August (22.02%) and the highest in March (23.96%). 

For the bottom 25% of casual games, we noticed a peak in March (13.81%) as well, while the lowest day 1 retention was observed in October (12.23%).

High retention rates in March happened due to the pandemic and the lockdown, when people had more free time to play games.

 

Day 7 Retention for Casual Mobile Games

For the top 2% of casual games, peak day 7 retention happened in, you guessed it, March (24.78%). It was the lowest in October (22.54%). 

If we look at the data for the top 25% of casual games, day 7 retention ranged from 8.49% in January to 6.87% in December. 

For the median 50% of casual games, the highest day 7 retention was in January (4.44%) and the lowest was in December (3.55%), just like it was for the top 25%. 

When it comes to bottom 25% of casual games, day 7 retention went from 1.43% in November to 1.23% in December. February, March, and June were also strong with 1.40% to 1.42%.

 

Day 28 Retention for Casual Mobile Games

If you can get a good retention rate after 28 days, you’re winning.

However, the reality is, many games, including casual games, cannot achieve that.

Let’s first define what is considered to be a good day 28 retention rate. If we look at all mobile game categories, an average 28-day retention rate is between 1% and 2%.

For top-performing games, it’s about 4% on average, even though that number started to decline towards the end of 2019. So anything above 4% is considered good, generally speaking.

For the top 2% of casual games, day 28 retention peaked in March (14.67%). It was the lowest in May (12.65%). 

If we look at data for the top 25% of casual games, it ranged from 2.68% in January to 2.22% in September. 

The median 50% of casual games retained the most users after 28 days in February (0.94%) and the least in September (0.75%). 

Day 28 retention for the bottom 25% of casual games was pretty much non-existent, which should concern all casual developers. For every month except March and April, day 28 retention was 0%. For those two months, it was 0.01%, which is miniscule. 

How to Improve Casual Mobile Game User Retention

So how to get a good retention rate for a casual mobile game?

We asked Mike Khorev, a marketing consultant with experience in mobile games.

Here’s what he has to say about improving casual mobile game user retention.

“I’ve handled several mobile developer clients in the past, and I am also an avid gamer so I’ll answer this based on experience.

I think there are several factors that are really important in maintaining and improving user retention:

1. First Impression

To keep gamers coming back, it’s very important to give them a great first impression and user experience. There are games that can bounce back from bad initial launch, but it’s typically more difficult. Make sure your game is well-polished during launch, and provide a good interactive tutorial.

Also, a huge aspect of a great first impression is the game’s overall designs and gameplay.

2. The balance between “fullness” and DLC content

This is why managing retention is sometimes tricky. On the one hand, you’ll need to give users the feeling that they do get a finished game on their hands, but on the other hand, we’ll need to update them with new content from time to time. This can be very difficult to maintain in the long run.

3. Realistic microtransaction

Microtransactions and gachas are getting all the backlash nowadays, but at the same time, we all know it’s how game developers (especially mobile game developers) make money nowadays.

In my opinion, it’s better to be honest with the microtransaction options (especially if it involves RNG/gacha), their % rates and overall don’t be too greedy. Give players affordable (or even free) ways to get something valuable out of your games so they can still have fun when they can’t spend a lot on microtransactions.”

 

Casual Mobile Games Average Session Length Statistics

Another important metric to track is average session length. It shows you how much time has passed from the moment the users open your game to the moment they exit. In other words, how long they play your game.

If we look at all mobile game genres the average session length is about 7 minutes. So anything above that is great.

Average session length for the top 2% of casual games was high in the first half of 2020 and then went down in the second half of 2020. More specifically, it was the highest in March, which was expected due to the coronavirus lockdown (57 minutes and 11 seconds). It started going down significantly in August, and hit the lowest point in October (43 minutes and 28 seconds). However, that’s still a very high ASL. 

It’s a similar situation for the top 25% of casual games. It started at 7 minutes and 35 seconds in January and declined to 6 minutes and 35 seconds in December. 

For the median 50% of casual games, the average session length ranged from 4 minutes and 2 seconds in April to 3 minutes and 44 seconds in December. 

The average session length for the bottom 25% of games was between 2 minutes and 37 seconds in July and 2 minutes and 31 seconds in May.

 

Casual Mobile Games ARPPU Statistics

ARPPU is short for average revenue per paying user. “Paying user” refers to players who spend money in your game whether it’s for game download (if it’s a paid game) or in-app purchases.

For the top 2% of casual games, ARPPU was very high – from $83.96 (March) to $68.2 (February). 

If we look at the data for the top 25% of casual games, ARPPU peaked in April ($10.44). It was the lowest in February ($9.81). Notice that ARPPU for the top 25% of games was significantly lower than for the top 2% of casual games. 

When it comes to the median 50% of casual games, ARPPU was between $5.63 and $5 in 2020. 

For the bottom 25% of casual games, it was between $2.05 and $1.27. 

 

Casual Mobile Games ARPDAU Statistics

ARPDAU refers to average revenue per daily active user and it shows you the amount of money you earn daily from a single user.

Average revenue per daily active user in the top 2% of casual games was between $0.68 and $0.42. It started rising in March, reaching its peak in September, after which it slightly declined. 

The top 25% got a max of $0.06 per active user in April and May. The lowest ARPDAU was in November and December – $0.05.

For the median 50% of casual games, ARPDAU ranged from $0.018 to $0.012 in the last few months of 2020. 

The bottom 25% of casual games had an extremely low ARPDAU – from $0.002 to $0.003.

 

Casual Mobile Game Conversion Rates

When it comes to in-app purchases, it’s important to know how many users actually make a purchase. That’s what conversion rates show you – a percentage of users who made a purchase on a particular day.

For the top 2% of casual games, it was higher in the second half of 2020, reaching its peak in August – an average of 5.31%. 

For the top 25%, conversion rates were highest in May with 0.89%, and lowest in January with 0.74%. 

If we look at conversion rates for the median 50% of casual games, they ranged from 0.33% to 0.39%, and seem to be the highest during summer months. 

The bottom 25% of casual games had very low conversion rates – from 0.13% in October and November to 0.17% in April, May, and June. 

In general, conversion rates are dropping for all mobile game genres. That’s mainly because more and more publishers are monetizing their game by using in-game ads, rather than in-app purchases.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *